122 East 76th St #1B
New York, NY 10021

Phone: 212-628-8771
Fax: 212-794-0136
info@glsnyllp.com
122 East 76th St #1B
New York, NY 10021

Phone: 212-628-8771
Fax: 212-794-0136
info@glsnyllp.com

General and Laparoscopic Surgeons of New York

Was founded to provide the highest level of surgical care to all patients. All surgeons are Board Certified and have between ten to forty years of clinical experience and training, each highly skilled with special interests and areas of expertise, such as in hernia repair, splenectomy, appendectomy and all other surgical procedures.

Mission Statement

General and Laparoscopic Surgeons, New York, is a group of surgeons who have formed to provide the highest level of Surgical Care. We have spent decades working together, perfecting techniques, and pooling information, in order to deliver a surgical experience above and beyond typical institutional care. Safety and Experience are the pillars of the practice.

WHAT IS AN INGUINAL HERNIA AND HOW SHOULD IT BE REPAIREDWhy there are so few Groin Pain/Sports Hernia/Pubalgia Specialists

Current Surgical Concepts

ESPN - Sport Science
I recently watched an ESPN video entitled "Sport Science: Aroldis Chapman," in which the mechanics of the 105 mph pitcher were examined. Although the torque Chapman generates on his elbow and shoulder are extraordinary, his separation of lower and upper body are to me, astonishing. As pointed out by Tom Howes, the typical pitcher averages 50 degrees of separation between shoulder and hip turn. Chapman generates 65 degrees! I note this because the exact point on the human body which feels the brunt of this force is the rectus aponeurotic plate. This is the point which attaches structures to the pubic bone. The two main muscles are the rectus abdominus, and the adductor longus. Other structures like the inguinal ligament, the conjoint tendon, and the pectineus muscle are also involved. Simply put, this one point of attachment bears the load of this extraordinary force. Unfortunately, when this structure is injured, it may not heal without appropriate rest and physical therapy. In some cases, it cannot heal, and requires surgery. I see a large contingent of ball players in my practice, many of them pitchers. After watching videos like these, I am not surprised.
NHL Ducks
NHL Ducks captain Ryan Getzlaf apparently played in the Western Conference finals with a sports hernia, as revealed on the NBC Sports website. Ultimately, he did not need surgery. It is important to realize that not all sports hernia diagnoses are ultimately a surgical problem. In the right setting, with a mild injury, a sports hernia, or more appropriately, athletic pubalgia, can be overcome with rest and a specialized physical therapy regimen. Only after these options have failed, or the MRI findings are severe, will surgery be required.
Advancing Technology in Surgery

As the age of minimally invasive surgery continues to progress, modalities for operating are becoming more and more sophisticated. Robotic surgery and Single port surgery are just two of the plethora of recent examples. In many ways, this phenomenon is driven by technological breakthrough. There are, however, other forces at work, not the least of which is the medical device industry. As with all advances, the advent of new technology has to be supported, but also evaluated to an exceedingly high degree. Just because a technology becomes available does not mean it is in the best interests of the patient or the society as a whole. To this end, General and Laparoscopic Surgeons is both learning and evaluating new technologies for its patients on a constant basis. Our recent attendance at both the American College of Surgeons (ACS), and the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) represents the continued devotion we have to patient care and the future.

Common Symptoms

A bulge in the groin which can come and go; gets bigger with straining, lifting heavy objects, sneezing, coughing, usually worse at the end of the day, and better in the morning.

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A bulge in the groin or just below the groin crease, sometimes painful, especially when getting in or out of the car, or standing for long periods of time.

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A bulge in the abdomen, sometimes painful sometimes not; get bigger and smaller, usually when intra-abdominal pressure increases like coughing or sneezing; might be under or near an old scar like a C-section or appendectomy scar.

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Having an outie belly button which seems to be getting bigger, sometimes painful sometimes not.

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Pain in the right side, up by the rib cage or up under the rib cage after a meal, usually a fatty meal like pizza; pain could also be in the right or mid back, or in the right shoulder or neck.

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There are a variety of colon issues which often times present with common symptoms. Typical symptoms include bloating, abdominal distention, blood in the stool, diarrhea, constipation, and any noticeable change in bowel habits. Evaluation of the colon is often done with both blood and stool laboratory studies, as well as colonoscopy.

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Problems with the live can often present with right sided upper abdominal pain, usually up under the rib cage and into the back. Yellowed skin called jaundice or eyes called scleral icterus may occur as well.

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